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Some useful Phrasal Verbs used in Human Resource Management

21 Aug

Learn the most common phrasal verbs used in Human Resources in English:

‘close down’ = to shut

  • We have closed down the small local branches and created bigger regional offices.
  • The factory closed down in the 1970’s because it was too expensive to produce here.

‘fight against’ = to make an effort to stop something happening

  • All the workers fought against the closure but the plant was no longer profitable.
  • The unions have been fighting against the proposed changes as they think it will mean job losses.

‘go back on something’ = to change an agreement

  • We had come to an agreement but now she has gone back on it.
  • The company promised to review the situation but went back on its word and didn’t.

‘put back’ = to postpone, delay in time

  • They promised to make a decision today but it has been put back until next week.
  • My visit has been put back until a later date when it will be easier to plan.

‘fall behind’ = not risen as fast as, fail to do something as fast as required

  • We have fallen behind schedule. It won’t be completed on time.
  • Our salaries have fallen behind the national average with the small increase we have had.

‘turn down’ = to refuse, not accept

  • We offered a two per cent increase but it was turned down.
  • We offered him a much higher salary but he turned it down and didn’t join our team.

‘fill in for someone’ = to replace someone during an absence

  • I need to brief the person who will be filling in for me while I am on maternity.
  • I filled in for Jamie while he was on holiday.

‘back someone up’ = to support or to help

  • Whenever there is a dispute with someone in my team, my manager always backs me up.
  • Nobody backed him up when he said he had been discriminated against.

‘work out’ = to calculate

  • I don’t know how much holiday I have left. I need to work it out.
  • We need to work out how much this is really going to cost.

‘drag on’ = to last a long time, go on longer than anticipated

  • The negotiations are dragging on. I think we’ll never reach an agreement.
  • The meeting dragged on and on. I thought I’d never get home.

 

We shoul parctice, the exercises given below: ( to understand English for Human Resource Management)
Exercise 1

Exercise 2

Exercise 3

Exercise 4

In English, we use a lot of phrasal verbs. These are verbs with more than one part; the verb and one or two particles. Let’s continue looking at some of the most common in the area of Human Resources:

‘get on’ = to have a good relationship

  • I don’t like my boss. We just don’t get on.
  • The atmosphere is terrible. He doesn’t get on with his co-workers.

‘follow up’ = to find out more about or take further action on something.

  • Before we offer her the job, we need to follow up on her references.
  • The training is followed up by regular refresher courses over a six-month period.

‘set up’ = to arrange for an activity or event to happen

  • I’d like to discuss it further. Can we set up a meeting?
  • I’ve set up interviews with the remaining three candidates.

‘make up’ = do or pay extra to cover a difference.

  • I’d like to leave early on Friday. I’ll make up the time next week.
  • There was an error in your expenses. We’ll make up the difference next month.

‘hand in’ = to give something

  • He’s leaving at the end of the month. He has handed in his resignation.
  • I haven’t handed my time sheet in yet. I must do it now.

‘work out’ your notice = to continue working through the period after you have resigned.

  • They asked him to leave immediately. He didn’t have to work out his notice.
  • He negotiated a deal so he didn’t have to work out his notice and could leave sooner.

‘sort out’ = to resolve

  • We don’t know who is going to replace Sue. We have to sort it out soon.
  • I have finally sorted out the error on the time sheets. It’s all correct now.

‘carry on’ = to continue

  • We still haven’t found a suitable candidate. We’ll have to carry on looking.
  • Until we get the new software installed, we’ll have to carry on using the old.

‘back out’ = to decide not to do something previously agreed.

  • They had agreed to do it but then backed out.
  • He had accepted the post but backed out at the last minute so we’re considering other candidates.

‘go with’ = to adopt or support an idea or plan.

  • I think your idea is a good one. I think we should go with it.
  • We’re not really sure which agency to go with. We don’t think any of them are really what we are really looking for.

 We shoul parctice, the exercises given below: ( to understand English for Human Resource Management)

Exercise 1

Exercise 2

Exercise 3

Exercise 4

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Posted by on August 21, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

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